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The massive expansion for Liffey Valley Shopping Centre has finally been granted planning permission, but parking at the site could be problematic. South Dublin County Council (SDCC) has given the go-ahead for additional retail space, along with an Olympic-sized indoor ice rink, but denied permission for the construction of a 1,800 car parking facility. The [...]
 

The massive expansion for Liffey Valley Shopping Centre has finally been granted planning permission, but parking at the site could be problematic.
South Dublin County Council (SDCC) has given the go-ahead for additional retail space, along with an Olympic-sized indoor ice rink, but denied permission for the construction of a 1,800 car parking facility.
The application was submitted earlier this year by real estate investment firm Hines Ireland.
“It is clear that the local authority has supported the overall scheme by approving the retail, leisure and public realm elements, but we note that at this stage it still has reservations about aspects of the parking adjacent to the ice arena,” said Hines senior managing director Brian Moran.
“We will now review the basis for the omission and work towards an improved solution as soon as we can,” he said.
The expansion at Liffey Valley will feature an additional 7,000 sq m of retail space, 3,774 sq m of restaurant space, a refurbished 14-screen cinema and an Olympic-sized indoor ice arena that can hold 2,500 spectators for skating competitions, ice hockey matches and other entertainment events.
The new development, dubbed the Western End, is due to be completed by the end of this year.
In March, members of SDCC raised concerns about the impact construction would have on traffic in the area, especially on the frequently congested N4 road.
At the time, the National Roads Authority and Transport Infrastructure Ireland said they were concerned about the proposed car park, mainly because it would be free to use and discourage drivers from using alternative means of transport.
Liffey Valley Shopping Centre is owned by a group of clients from HSBC Private Bank, Grosvenor Britain & Ireland and Hines Ireland.
It opened in 1998 on the controversial Quarryvale site, which was the subject of the Mahon planning tribunal.

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